Benzodiazepine Addiction

prescription pill bottles, benzodiazepine addiction factsBenzodiazepine addiction is a growing problem in the United States. With ever increasing numbers of prescriptions being written for anxiety related issues, addiction to the prescribed medications also increases. Benzodiazepines are highly addictive and doctors have noticed that prolonged use of these drugs can lead to addiction, they try to keep prescriptions low and for as short of time as possible. If you do find yourself or a loved one addicted to these it is important to get them help because overdose is likely.

Here at Recovery Ways our Master level clinicians are dedicated to providing all our patients with the highest quality of care. We have individualized plans for each of our patients so that they get the treatment that is best for them and their addiction. We can help make overcoming the addiction and staying sober easier.

Types of Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepine or “benzos” are a class of pharmaceutical drugs used for many different reasons. Benzos were originally created to replace barbiturates and most are in tablet or pill form for oral consumption. They are legal when they are prescribed but people also obtain them illegally. They affect the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor and are a central nervous system (CNS) depressant, causing users to feel high with prolonged sedation. Benzodiazepine can change the brain’s neurochemistry and users can develop physical and mental dependencies. It is very easy to overdose on benzos, which can lead to seizures and comas. Users heart rates and breathing can slow and cause the user to die. Many users mix benzos with alcohol or even opiate drugs. Here are the different kinds of benzodiazepine.

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Alprazolam (Xanax) is often prescribed for insomnia, panic attacks, clinical depression, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). It is 20 times stronger than Valium and it is the number one prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States and addiction develops quickly. Withdrawal symptoms resemble those of barbiturate or alcohol withdrawal and can be deadly. Depending on the dosage Xanax comes in pills of different colors and shapes. It can also be called xannies (zannies), blue footballs, bars, or handlebars.

Lorazepam (Ativan) is an anti-anxiety medication. It can also be used for other reasons such as insomnia and epilepsy. It is also called stupefy, goofballs, and heavenly blues.

Diazepam (Valium) is a common sedative prescribed for many reasons, including muscle spasms and anxiety. It affects the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the brain. They cause the heightened sense of anxiety relief and sedation. Abusing Valium often happens to someone who was prescribed the drug by their doctor, but because the body builds a tolerance to the drug with extended use, they may need a higher dosage.

Triazolam (Halcion) is most commonly prescribed for insomnia and anxiety. Doctors usually do not prescribe it for more than 10 days because it is so addictive. Because Triazolam impacts the brain to the point of extreme drowsiness and sedation which increases the risk of an overdose. Some users have said that they experienced hallucinations. Halcion withdrawal can be deadly, it is best to have medically supervised detox. Halcion is also called “Up Johns.”

Clonazepam (Klonopin) usually prescribed to treat panic attacks, epilepsy, and short term insomnia. It is a blue tablet and also referred to as k-pins. Click here to read more about Klonopin.

Chlordiazepoxide (Librium) is prescribed to treat anxiety and to treat insomnia. Librium is a crystalline, white substance that comes in multi-colored capsules with different dosages. Some street names for Librium are: nerve pills, normies, bennies, blue bombs, blues, L, and ruffies.

Common names for Benzodiazepine

  • BZDs
  • Benzos
  • Tranks
  • Downers

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

Benzodiazepine addiction affects thousands, but help is available. Recovery Ways offers effective and affordable drug rehab care in Salt Lake City. If you are experiencing issues related so substance abuse and need drug treatment now, please reach out to our highly trained and passionate admission coordinators. Our admission coordinators will review your insurance benefits and walk you through the entire admissions process.

To start the admission process and receive immediate help, please call 888.986.7848.

Symptoms and Warning Signs of Benzodiazepine Abuse

Benzodiazepine is prescribed as pills and intended to be orally taken but users might also crush it, snort it, or inject in. Sometimes people do not realize they are addicted to it because their doctor prescribed it. However, if you notice unusual behavior, they can’t function with the drug, constantly needing it even when the prescription isn’t ready to be filled, or they are visiting multiple doctors for multiple prescriptions, also know as “doctor shopping.” These are some signs you or your loved one may be addicted to benzodiazepines.

Short Term Symptoms

  • Insomnia, drowsiness, coma
  • Blurred vision, dizziness, lack of coordination
  • Anxiety, headaches, slurred speech
  • Weakness, difficulty breathing

Long Term Symptoms

  • Dizziness, fainting
  • Slowed breathing
  • Depression, aggressive, hostile
  • Hallucinations, confusion
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Muscle tremors

Signs and symptoms of a benzo addiction can be devastating to the addict, their friends, and their family. Addiction warning signs can help determine if someone is need of treatment. If a benzodiazepine addiction is suspected, treatment may be necessary. Treatment for a benzo addiction will most likely be a mixture of medical detox, inpatient treatment and consistent after care for long-term sobriety.

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

Benzodiazepine addiction can make you feel alone and helpless, but help is available. Recovery Ways offers effective and affordable drug rehab care in Salt Lake City. If you are experiencing issues related so substance abuse and need drug treatment now, please reach out to our highly trained and passionate admission coordinators. Our admission coordinators will review your insurance benefits and walk you through the entire admissions process.

Start the admission process and receive immediate help. Please call our team at 888.986.7848